Lunch Dates with History

  • Time: 11:00 AM to 1:30 PM

The Museum of Howard County History (8328 Court Ave, Ellicott City) is proud to host a series of lectures for 2018. Bring your own lunch. Drinks and treats will be provided. Tickets are Free for HCHS Members and only $5 for non-members.

Doors open at 11:30am. Each lecture runs noon-1:00pm followed by an optional tour of the museum 1:00-1:30pm.

For more information, call 410-480-3250 or email info@hchsmd.org.

Members and non-members should use our upgraded ticketing system to acquire tickets.

Click here for tickets

Sept. 7th:   "Flour Power: a new take on the origins of America's Industrial Revolution." Lecture and Book Signing with Hal Sharp

New England's late-18th and early-19th century textile mills have long been seen as the originators of the American Industrial Revolution.  In this lecture – and in a new book – architectural historian Henry K. Sharp tells the story of another industry, one that started the process in the mid-Atlantic region a generation before factory textiles began to roll out of northeastern mills.

 

Oct. 5th: “Charles Carroll / Carrollton Hall.” – with Judge Roger Whelan

Judge Whelan is an expert on the history of the historic Manor House, which in 1832 was home to Emily MacTavish, granddaughter of Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

 

Nov. 2nd: “Korean Immigration to Howard County.” – with Charley Sung

Mr. Sung currently serves as the President of the Korean American Community Association of Howard County. In that capacity, Mr. Sung represents the interest of Korean residents of Howard County before the Office of the County Executive. Mr. Sung also serves as a Commissioner on the Howard County Ethics Commission. He will discuss Korean immigration to Howard County during the latter half of the 20th century.

 

Dec. 7th: “ Columbia at 50 – 10 Things You Didn’t Know.” – with Maryland Reporter Journalist Len Lazarick

Len Lazarick will present stories from his new book, Columbia at 50 as well as stoires from his 50 years of “newspapering in Howard County”.

Lunch Dates with History